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Table of Contents

CHAPTER 5: CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Introduction

The present chapter is aimed towards discussing the conclusion and recommendations in which the researcher has drawn the necessary conclusion of research findings and results based on the analysis of immigration impact on GDP growth, along with providing effective recommendations to the future researchers and policymakers of the country. Moreover, the chapter has incorporated a brief set of summarised findings which are directed towards the assessment of the impact of immigration on the economic development of the country within the case of the UK. In addition, some future implications are also discussed in this chapter which explains how the future researcher can get benefitted by the research and the findings.

Summarised Findings

In this research, the main aim of the research was focused towards the analysis and assessing the significance of the impact of immigration on the economic development of UK. However, the objectives of the study were focused towards the study of the concepts of Immigration and Economic Development from a theoretical perspective, the identification of the key factors that lead towards the economic development of a country and the assessment of the impact of immigration on the economic development (GDP Growth Rate) of UK. Furthermore, in the research, the researcher has undertaken the quantitative research design in order to analyse the impact of the immigration on the economic development of the UK. 

From the study analysis, it was identified that the immigration can lead to the development of the country from the economic perspective because the migration of the people has some of the implications for the economic, social and culture for the host societies and the remittances where the migrants can send it to their home is perhaps regarded as the link between the economic development the immigrants in the country. In addition to the above statement, the remittances and the migration can either have direct or indirect influences on the welfare of the population with the sending countries. According to the statement given by Goldring and Landolt (2012), after the credit crunch, the financial crisis within the countries have started to observe the fact that the potential sources of the capital maintenance in the country are the acquaintances of the remittances within the country. In such cases, the migrants are expected to be loyal than the average investors in the country which are essentially interested in the financing infrastructure with the health, education and housing projects. However, in the present study, the GDP growth rates are not associated with the immigrants’ numbers in the UK and ultimately with the unemployment as the data which was collected for the study are not stationary. Therefore, no relation was identified between the dependent and independent variables of the study. 

Policy Recommendations

There is a vast literature carried out in the discussion of the policy which nurtures the benefits and hence mitigates the negative impact of the immigration with a country setting. The migration within the UK should be incorporated in the development cooperation strategies along with the national poverty reduction strategies in different states of the UK. However, it is rare in practice, but there are some cases which report the successful strategies for the cooperative efforts between the receiving and sending countries for the effective management of migration. In addition to the above statement, there are certain areas of cooperation which includes the drivers of the migration in the source countries networks which can move the people between different borders and further integrates the legal immigrants into the destination countries.

A large number of developing countries have a large number of immigrants in the country where few of them have explicit policies regarding the immigration or the capacities for managing the migration within the source country, and the networks which move the people across borders and the integration of the legal migrants into the destination countries. The government of the country should also explicitly take into account the impact of the composition and the future size of the UK population and further review the implications of the projection which the overall net immigration in the future will be around. In this essence, the government of the country should have an explicit target regarding the indicative target for the adjustment of the immigration policies in line with the objectives.

Future Implications

In this research, the researcher has undertaken the quantitative research design where the researcher can also incorporate qualitative research design in order to further authenticate the research. Moreover, the researcher can also take interviews with the policy makers of the country in order to assess the impact of immigration on the economic development of the UK. Lastly, the researcher can undertake a case study of two countries in order to compare the economic effects followed by the increasing number of immigration within the country.

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